Falling Rock Taphouse Closes After 24 Years of Service
Falling Rock Taphouse Closes After 24 Years of Service in Denver, Colorado
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Craft Beer Institution, Falling Rock Taphouse, Says Goodbye After 24 Years of Service

Craft Beer Institution, Falling Rock Taphouse, Says Goodbye After 24 Years of Service

Falling Rock Taphouse Closes After 24 Years of Service
Falling Rock Taphouse Closes After 24 Years of Service in Denver, Colorado
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While visiting Denver this past week, I was fortunate enough to share lunch and a pint with some pretty prominent names in Colorado craft beer such as my pal Julia Herz, formerly of the BA and founder of HerzMuses Enterprises, Steve Kurowski ,formerly of the Colorado Brewers Guild, and friends (humble brag) as they shared the pivotal importance of Falling Rock Taphouse.

During lunch, the group made plans to visit Falling Rock on Sunday, but unfortunately, I was leaving Denver that day. So I settled for second best and pulled up on Saturday, as I was encouraged by another friendly face of Denver craft beer, Porch Drinking and Porch Collective founder, Tristan Chan – who first broke the news of the taproom’s closing, here.

The last offerings of Falling Rock Taphouse. 1997-2021

The taphouse, who coined the phrase “No Crap on Tap” was known for reaching out to highly sought after breweries and acquiring kegs and rare bottles of some of the finest liquid in the country, one of their mainstays being Russian River’s Pliny the Elder.

Being in close proximity to the Denver Convention Center and Coors’ Stadium, the taphouse quickly became an institution of being a launch and landing pad for GABF‘s week long festivities. I found that Falling Rock held decades of special memories for everyone in the craft beer industry, from beer celebrities, brewers, craft beer fans and everyone in between.

Firestone Walker’s Rolling Bones, an Barrel Aged American Wild Ale with Blackberries, Cherries and Plums.

Although it was my first and only time to visit this iconic establishment, I felt the celebratory and yet, somber tone from everyone in attendance. I was humbled and proud to be in the right place at the right time, and to raise a glass of Firestone Walker’s Rolling Bones to the contributions Falling Rock Taphouse made to, not only the the Denver craft beer scene, but the craft beer industry, as a whole.

Best of luck to founders Chris, Al and Steve Black. To read the brother’s farewell on the Falling Rock Taphouse blog, click here.

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